Quantcast

VILLAGE OF ROBBINS HOSTS TOWN HALL TO ADDRESS CORONAVIRUS

3/25/2020, noon | Updated on 3/25/2020, noon
Tyrone Ward, mayor of Robbins, hosted a town hall meeting to provide information about the novel coronavirus as a way ...
Village of Robbins Mayor Tyrone Ward (pictured) hosted a town hall meeting to address concerns residents might have about the novel coronavirus. Photo credit: Tia Carol Jones

Village of Robbins hosts town hall to address Coronavirus

BY TIA CAROL JONES

Tyrone Ward, mayor of Robbins, hosted a town hall meeting to provide information about the novel coronavirus as a way to answer residents’ questions and concerns. The meeting also included a presentation from Cook County Public Health Chief Operating Officer Dr. Terry Mason.

“We’re glad that you’re here to hear the information that is most pertinent for you and for us as a unit,” he said. “The goal is to be as transparent as possible when assuring the commitment toward dealing with the latest challenge that we have. My team is in position to be proactive, hence the meeting tonight. And, tweaking our own plan on a regular basis. Further, we are concerned about the entire region and willing to work cooperatively with all.”

Ward said working cooperatively is what is necessary to ride the wave. He has participated in conference calls with Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, as well as Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker.

Ward also recognized other officials from neighboring towns that were in attendance. Those included Wanda McDowell, from Markham; Bernard Ward, from Robbins; Jackie Franklin, from Cook County Commissioner Donna Miller’s office; Al Kendall from Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle’s office; Annie Coulter, mayor of Ford Heights; Yvonne Davis, Mayor of Dixmoor; Robert Polk, Mayor of Burnham; Christopher Clark, Mayor of Harvey. The chief of Robbins’ Fire Department and chief of Robbins’ Police Department were also in attendance.

“I am deeply appreciative of the opportunity to come and speak. It is always a pleasure to come to a place where you have regular common folk who want to learn some things. I applaud you and your team for organizing this so that we can share just a little bit,” Mason said.

Mason said while this coronavirus is new, there have been coronaviruses before – which include Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome. He said this coronavirus is called that because it is shaped like a crown.

“This particular virus that jumped from being a virus that was with an animal to a person, happened because of some human intervention,” he said.

“Most of the viruses we have come from animals. The way it happened in China, this virus was helped to be transmitted by bats. Bats who bite animals and they bite other animals. Just like when we get bitten by mosquitoes,” Mason said. “This particular virus that jumped from being a virus that was with an animal to a person, happened because of some human intervention.”

Mason cautioned people to beware of coughs and sneezes

“When you cough, or when you sneeze, those virus particles come out into your sneeze or into your cough. Those virus particles go out into the air,” he said.

He said when people walk past an area where an infected person freshly coughed or sneezed, or touched the surface, if they put it on your face and rubbed their nose, those particles can get into a person’s system.